Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Another Example Of A Military Tribunal On American Soil
Rotsa Ruck KSM

Yes, yes... we all know about the German saboteurs who were caught on American soil during WWII. We all know that they were tried by a military tribunal. And we all know that these sauerkrauts ended up doing the Gibbet Two-Step.

Well, here's another example of a Military Tribunal on American soil that not many are as aware of -

Lt. Gen. Tomoyuki Yamashita, Imperial Japanese Army (aka: The Tiger of Malaya) found his dumb-ass in a heap of unpleasantness just a little over 60 years ago.

To wit;
From 29 October to 7 December, 1945, an American military tribunal in Manila tried General Yamashita for war crimes relating to the Manila Massacre and many atrocities in the Philippines and Singapore against civilians and prisoners of war, such as the Sook Ching, and sentenced him to death.

The court found Yamashita guilty as charged and sentenced him to death. [Chief Counsel for the Defense, Colonel Harry E.] Clarke appealed the sentence to MacArthur, who upheld it. He then appealed to the Philippine Supreme Court and the United States Supreme Court, both of which declined to review the verdict. As a consequence, Yamashita was executed on 23 February 1946.
Now you may ask - "Caveman, what does this have to do with anything? All that happened in the Philippines, not the United States."

Did you notice the dates?
Military tribunal - 29 October to 7 December, 1945.
Execution - 23 February, 1946.

Here's one date the citation didn't mention.
Date of Philippine Independence - 4 July, 1946.

That's right. Prior to the 4th of July, 1946, The Philippines was not an independent nation, but a Commonwealth of the United States of America. Just like how the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is technically American soil... just like how the Commonwealth of The Northern Marianas is technically American soil.

Thus, here's another example of a military tribunal on American soil.

2 Comments:

Blogger Allan said...

Sook Ching was not mentioned in the Yamashita trial. It was all about the Philippines.

2:48 PM  
Blogger Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

You very well may be right. But that has no real bearing on the main argument of the posting.

And be it the PI or Singapore, Yamishita got what he deserved.

Thanks for commenting, Alan. Keep 'em coming!

4:42 PM  

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