Saturday, July 15, 2006

Why I'm Against The So-Called
"Luminous Mysteries"
There's a time and place for everything

I know, I know... Pope John Paul authorized the use of this "new" Mystery. And I still don't like it. Here's why;

The main reason - It was The Holy Mother that gave the Rosary to us, right? And that belief has been supported by The Church for almost 800 years.

The secondary reason - The "Luminous Mysteries" were NOT given to us by The Holy Mother, but by a man.

The "Luminous Mysteries" certainly are beautiful meditations, but they simply have no place in the Rosary. If Christ wanted His mother to give us an addendum to The Holy Rosary, He would have sent her. But He didn't. Yes, it really is as simple as that.

I for one say that it's time to bring all these silly novelties to an end.

14 Comments:

Blogger prevat2 said...

Am in full agreement. We have had 40 years of novelty and Protestant BS forced down our throats! Dear God: Let us return to Tradition!

4:35 PM  
Blogger St. Jimbob of the Apokalypse said...

Does anyone here believe that the Holy Spirit is indwelling in the successors of the Apostles, particularly the successor of Peter? If the Holy Father, motivated by the Holy Spirit, has given us these 'Luminous Mysteries', then Amen. The Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son, so it HAS been sent by Jesus!

9:03 PM  
Blogger Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

That doesn't cut it. In fact, it damn near kisses cult of personality.

Like I said, if Jesus wanted His mother to give us an addition, then He would have sent her.

Last time I checked, Pope John Paul isn't The Holy Mother.

10:52 PM  
Blogger Paul, just this guy, you know? said...

First, I'm not aware that the other three sets of mysteries were given to us by the Blessed Mother. My research into the history of the rosary doesn't get me people meditating on the fifteen joyful, sorrowful and glorious mysteries earlier than the fifteenth-century writings of St. Louis de Montfort (and if you haven't read him, and love Mary, you have a treat awaiting you).

Second, the rosary is not given to us by the Church, as the mass is. The rosary is a popular devotion; one might say it was given by the laity to the Church. The Pope has no authority to alter the rosary; it's not a sacrament you can be saved without praying the rosary at all (although I can't imagine why any Catholic would want to).

Third, Pope John Paul II's introduction of the luminous mysteries was purely optional; as indeed is everything else about the rosary. John Paul was explicit in offering his innovation as an option for the faithful. Anyone else could have done the same with the same authority; it's just that the Pope gets more attention.

I like and use the luminous mysteries and they've led me to new insights about my faith. But I wouldn't criticize anyone who chose the contrary path.

One insight I gained: in contemplating the mystery of the Transfiguration, it occurred to me that Jesus, in appearing to the three Apostles with Elijah and Moses, was appearing with two men who had been assumed bodily into Heaven (II Kings 2:11, Jude 1:9, Mark 9:4). These men constitute, with Enoch (Gen 5:24, Heb 11:5), a precedent for the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin.

This is not what anyone should be calling "Protestant BS"; it reinforced a specifically Catholic tennet of my Christian faith.

The Luminous mysteries are an invitation to contemplate another five important events in the public ministry of our Lord and Saviour. They direct our attention to the Gospel and to Christ, as all good prayer should do. I can't see why anyone should find them objectionable.

10:57 PM  
Blogger Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

Let me say this for a third time... if Jesus wanted His mother to give us an addition, then He would have sent her.

Last time I checked, Pope John Paul isn't The Holy Mother.

As far as John Paul's innovation is concerned, I think we see exactly where innovation has gotten us since the wide and sweeping changes brought forth in the so-called "Spirit of Vatican II".

12:07 AM  
Blogger St. Jimbob of the Apokalypse said...

Cavey, The Blessed Mother is not the Holy Spirit either. Jesus instituted His Church upon Peter, blessed the Church with the Holy Spirit, and promised to the Apostles that the Holy Spirit would be both comfort and counsel. Notice He never said that His mother Mary was in charge of the Church. The Church has wisely turned to her for succor and intercession, but Mary doesn't trump the Holy Spirit and the charisms related.

What are your thoughts on the specific mysteries in the Luminous Mysteries, and why do you object to their inclusion in the Rosary devotion?

12:39 PM  
Blogger Nicholas Jagneaux said...

I'd like to agree with Paul: no one is under any obligation to pray the rosary, let alone pray the new set of mysteries. The rosary is a devotion of choice.

The Mysteries of the Rosary encourage the faithful to contemplate the meaning of significant events in the life of Christ.

Personally, I can't quite "get into" the Luminous Mysteries; however, I respect that fact that they take into account very important events (baptism and institution of the eucharist, for example) that the "traditional" mysteries did not address.

Those who wish to skip right over the Luminous Mysteries may do so without fear of losing their souls.

As for innovation, the language of the first mass was Aramaic. As the apostles moved among the Gentiles, an innovation of using Greek developed. Then, the innovation of using Latin developed.

In the early Church, communicants reserved the Holy Sacrament of the altar and brought it home with them. Then an innovation developed that disallowed this.

It seems that innovation has been with us since the beginning. So, let's not treat the word as though it is spelled with only 4 letters.

1:21 PM  
Blogger Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

JimBob,
I'll try this yet again. St. Dominic was given The Rosary by The Holy Mother, not Pope John Paul II.

The Rosary was 150 Angelic Salutations (Ave Maria's) and 15 Pater Noster's, not 200 and 20.

Let me say this for a fourth time... if Jesus wanted His mother to give us an addition, then He would have sent her.

Also, by your rationale, should every single pope, cardinal, archbishop, and bishop be able to "innovate" the Rosary? Hey, why not?

I can see it now; The Humourous Mysteries, The Pensive Mysteries, The Tragic Mysteries, The 'I'm Bored And Have To Waste Another Saturday Night Playing D&D With These 12 Goombas' Mysteries.

Sheesh.... where does it end?


NICHOLAS,
Please read above.

Also, you have your history of the various Liturgies of Catholicism incorrect.

If you so desire to worship in Aramaic, no problem. The Maronite and the Chaldean Catholics have their liturgies in the ancient Aramaic.

If you so desire to worship in Greek, no problem, the Melkite Catholics have their liturgy in the ancient Greek.

We Catholics of The Church of Rome, however.... well, I'm sure you see where I'm going with this.

Also, it was Pope St. Gregory the Great who brought the Latin Mass into being back in the 500's. And prior to that, The Church of Rome had it's "Latin Mass" in it's embryonic form.

Pax, dudes!

3:05 PM  
Blogger Nicholas Jagneaux said...

Vir Speluncae Catholicus,

The Catholic Encyclopedia at newadvent.org has a wonderful article about the history of the rosary: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13184b.htm .

Please allow me to highlight a couple of passages:

"On the other hand, the practice of meditating on certain definite mysteries, which has been rightly described as the very essence of the Rosary devotion, seems to have only arisen long after the date of St. Dominic's death."

"Further, we are assured that the meditating upon the mysteries was not introduced until two hundred years after his death."

"It is in any case certain that at the close of the fifteenth century the utmost possible variety of methods of meditating prevailed, and that the fifteen mysteries now generally accepted were not uniformly adhered to even by the Dominicans themselves."

As these quotes demonstrate, there is plenty of historical reason to believe that the rosary can be prayed with variation - or innovation, if you like - in its mysteries that justifies the additional mysteries suggested by Pope John Paul II.

If I wanted to, I could privately pray a brand new set of mysteries focused on, for example, each episode of healing done by Jesus. This could be done, for example, in the Perpetual Adoration chapel of my local hospital as I prayed for the sick to be healed.

By this rationale, I can piously "innovate" the mysteries of the prayer.

Please note that I said piously. I know that you were kidding (and I did laugh) when you wrote, "The 'I'm Bored And Have To Waste Another Saturday Night Playing D&D With These 12 Goombas' Mysteries." However, the Luminous Mysteries are a pious attempt to contemplate the life and ministry of our Saviour.

The rosary is a devotional aide designed to draw us into the mystery of Christ and his life. The Luminous Mysteries do a remarkable job of including, in a formalized way, important events of his ministry.

No one - not you, not me - has to pray the rosary. And if we only wanted to pray one mystery, or just two, or maybe even the 3 "traditional" ones, that's okay.

Salaam, dude :)

4:22 PM  
Blogger Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

Nick,
I understand and appriciate what you have said. I'll agree, there have been "changes", for lack of a better word (possibly 'upgrades' is more correct) to what The Holy Mother gave to St Dominic.

But what Pope John Paul did was quite different. He added on to the original. And I'm of the opinion that his add-on wasn't needed nor necissary.

Has it added to the reverence and solemnity of The Rosary? What purpose has/does it serve?

And most importantly... where/when does it end?

Et cum spirito tuo, bubba.

5:00 PM  
Blogger Vir Speluncae Catholicus said...

Nick,
I understand and appriciate what you have said. I'll agree, there have been "changes", for lack of a better word (possibly 'upgrades' is more correct) to what The Holy Mother gave to St Dominic.

But what Pope John Paul did was quite different. He added on to the original. And I'm of the opinion that his add-on wasn't needed nor necissary.

Has it added to the reverence and solemnity of The Rosary? What purpose has/does it serve?

And most importantly... where/when does it end?

Et cum spirito tuo, bubba.

5:19 PM  
Blogger Dymphna said...

I can't really get into the luminous mysteries. For one thing, the name stinks. It sounds so New Agey.

6:51 PM  
Blogger Gaufridus said...

My $0.02,

I pray the Traditional Rosary, i.e. -- the one without the "Luminous Mysteries".

I have the same opinion concerning innovations to the Rosary as I do concerning innovations to the Mass: yeah, they might not be heretical in and of themselves, but why take the chance? If you stick with Tradition, you *know* you cant go wrong.

If you choose the Novus Ordo... well, I hope you know what you are doing!

Pax tecum

10:27 PM  
Blogger Karen said...

I am so glad you said that, I've been thinking it all along! Divine revelation does not need to be improved upon.

9:58 PM  

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